Posts Tagged ‘stephen king’

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The Shadow Over Lovecraft

November 23, 2015

It is true I hold a soft spot for H. P. Lovecraft; his stories are among those that made me want to write. It is an unfortunate history, then, fraught with caveats; this is the problem:

First, Lovecraft―who wrote “The Call of Cthulhu,” “The Colour Out of Space” and other influential tales of madness and “sentient blob[s] of self-shaping gelatinous flesh”―is one of weird fiction’s most celebrated authors. He is enshrined in the Library of America.H. P. Lovecraft Stephen King calls him “the twentieth century’s greatest practitioner of the classic horror tale.” The author of the novel “Psycho,” Robert Bloch, once wrote, “Poe and Lovecraft are our two American geniuses of fantasy, comparable each to the other, but incomparably superior to all the rest who follow.”

Second, as Lovecraft’s letters―and, to a lesser extent, his stories―reveal, the guy harbored a fierce loathing for almost all non-WASPs. Blacks were “greasy chimpanzees,” in Lovecraft’s words. French-Canadians were a “clamorous plague.” New York’s Chinatown was “a bastard mess of stewing mongrel flesh.” And so on.

Phillip Eil’s explanation, for Salon, of the final distribution of Howards for the World Fantasy Award does, indeed, follow the gravity of the tale. It only goes downhill from there.

We can try making what excuses we want; he was a misanthrope, he was crazy, he was an extreme product of something whatnot whonow … er … right. It’s possible to do the five stages; I recommend skipping tracks to acceptance. Then again, neither do I know how many of the generation that comes after me even bothered with Lovecraft, so maybe my own years of reflecting on the question really are as useless as they have always felt.

Still, though. Sigh.

No, no, I’m not fretting for the trophies. It’s just, you know, it’s just one of those, This is why we can’t have nice things! feeling. Lovecraft, Koestler, Cosby. Sometimes it just hurts to face up to what all goes into the art we love, y’know?

But it’s true, he was a miserable, sickly, repulsive sort of genius.

―bd

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Image note: H. P. Lovecraft in undated photo via Wikimedia.

Eil, Phillip. “The ghost that haunts American literature: The genius & the repugnance of H.P. Lovecraft”. Salon. 21 November 2015.

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Monday notes

November 23, 2009

In case your Monday passing slowly, and you need something to help pass the time:

  • Kim Stanley Robinson explains why dystopia is easy.
  • James White offers insights into the films of Terry Gilliam.
  • Ben Schott‘s readers had fun with drunks.
  • Stephen King on Raymond Carver.
  • David Jolly brings us a morbid moment from France.
  • WNYC’s Studio 360 brings us Darwin in verse, Denis Dutton on The Art Instinct, murder and drama among chimpanzees, and original fiction from Lydia Millet (read by Martha Plimpton).

And as I’m having a hard time coming up with anything else, how about a Totoro bus?

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“China Lake” makes splash in U.S. via U.K. King

June 29, 2008

Over at Amazon’s book blog, Omnivoracious.com, Jeff VanderMeer interviews American author Meg Gardiner about the circuitous route her novels took finding a U.S. publisher, and reveals some interesting insight into today’s editorial mindset.

Meg Gardiner, China Lake, and Stephen King: The Complete Story
by Jeff VanderMeer on June 24, 2008

Meg Gardiner’s China Lake was released earlier this month by Obsidian Mysteries after a convoluted path to U.S. publication. It’s a firecracker of a novel featuring Gardiner’s trademark character Evan Delaney. In this first of a five-book series, Delaney gets deeply involved in a murder mystery after her ex-sister-in-law Tabitha joins the religious group called the Remnant. The writing throughout is taut and exciting, and I’m looking forward to reading the other books in the series, which Obsidian will release shortly. I recently interviewed Gardiner via email about the novel…

Read full article

–msg