Posts Tagged ‘copyright’

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Law & more order in store for Irvine

April 20, 2009

Winner of two Emmys and two Golden Globes for his work on HBO’s Band of Brothers and From Earth to the Moon, writer/producer Erik Bork joins us for the first time. In addition to introducting at least two new workshops, Erik will be accepting a limited number of screenplay submissions for advance critique, followed by one-on-one consultation. And to help writers better understand some of the most vexing issues we face in today’s ever-changing transmedia publishing world, intellectual property and entertainment attorney Mark I. Reichenthal will is also aboard. No matter what level of writer you are, his will be a session you won’t want to miss. Get all the lowdown at WritersConference.com.

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Author’s Guild, Alice and the rabbit hole of copyright collusion

April 12, 2009

From author/attorney Lawrence Lessig, via his blog:

Amazon has caved into demands from the Authors Guild that it disable the ability of the Kindle to read a book aloud. This is very bad news.

We had this battle before. In 2001, Adobe released e-book technology that gave rights holders (including publishers of public domain books) the ability to control whether the Adobe e-book reader read the book aloud. The story got famous when it was shown that one of its public domain works — Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland — was marked to forbid the book to be read aloud. (Here’s a piece I wrote about this in 2001).

Now the issue is back. The Authors Guild has objected because Amazon’s Kindle 2 has a function built in that enables the book to be read aloud. So when, for example, you’re commuting, you can plug your Kindle 2 into your MP3 jack and have the book read aloud.

Amazon rightly argued that this did not violate any of the exclusive rights granted by copyright law to the copyright owners. In that, Amazon is exactly right. But nonetheless, it will now enable publishers to decide whether the Kindle books they sell will permit the book to be read aloud. And of course, that includes public domain books.

So here we go again — How long till we can buy Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland and be told that this book “cannot be read aloud”?

>>read entire article

–msg