Archive for July, 2011

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The alien anthropologists ….

July 22, 2011

Time capsules buried in Los Angeles areaWhat’s in your time capsule?

Well, presuming you would ever bury one, what would be inside?

-bd

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Paperback blues

July 22, 2011

Publisher’s Weekly offers the following tidbit:

All major adult print segments—hardcover, paperback and mass market—showed a decline in sales in May, according to the AAP’s monthly sales report. While e-books showed a steep uptick of 146.9% for the month, bringing in $73.4 million in sales, adult hardcovers dropped 38.2%, adult paperbacks dropped 14.3%, and adult mass market fell 39.4%. For the calendar year, e-books brought in $389.7 million in sales, a 160.1% climb over the same period 2010.

Young Adult paperbacks, as well as a couple of other sectors, did see improved sales in May.

Chris Walters, meanwhile, noted that these numbers apply to traditional publishers:

I’d be curious to see sales numbers for self-published ebooks, which I don’t think are included in these monthly reports put out by the AAP. Although all I have to go on right now are anecdotes, Joe Konrath admitted that he and at least a few other self-pubbed authors saw sales of their ebooks drop in June.

All that can be rightly said, I suppose, is that the times, they are a’changin’.

-bd

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Stranger Than Fiction: More Tragic Than Tragedy Itself

July 18, 2011

Talk about a headline:

Woman shoots at puppy, kills husband instead

The detail is even more bizarre:

Witnesses tell police that the pit bull named “Cocaine” had lunged at some children and tried to attack them on Friday. The dead man’s son says the children were taken inside and his father picked the dog up.

It was then that police say Betty Walker fired twice, hitting the dog once and her husband once in the chest. Jackson police spokeswoman Colendula Green says the death of 53-year-old Robert Walker appears to have been accidental.

The dog is with animal control, and Ms. Walker will face a grand jury in HInds County, Mississippi.

But I do wonder what our friends who specialize in crime fiction would do with a piece like this as a plot core.

Condolences, of course, to the Walker family.

-bd

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A little bird told me ….

July 18, 2011

Good news from our friend Mr. Decker:

Edwin Decker starts the rumor-mill for his forthcoming anthology.

Unfortunately, the comma is included with the hyperlink in that one, so it doesn’t go through. That’s okay, though. Anyone interested in Puna Press, or in bugging them about release dates for Bartender in Heat: The Anthology (can you work an orgy joke into the title?) can just click on the link in this sentence.

Or follow his ramblings on Twitter.

Or Facebook.

Ye gads and huckleberries. I need to catch up on this social networking thing. Hell, I thought the internet was still a series of interconnected tubes.

Never mind. Just make good with Decker, so he’ll remember you when he gets invited on Rachel Maddow‘s show to discuss cocktails.

And, yes. I know the title of this post sucks. It’s supposed to; I’m a sucker for bad jokes.

-bd

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Is there such thing as a happy birthday for Holden Caulfield?

July 18, 2011

Michael Moats takes a few minutes to look back at sixty years of J. D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye, which reached its sixtieth birthday this weekend.

-bd

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Martin tops first-day sales, year to date

July 14, 2011

The news in from Galleycat:

Novelist George R.R. Martin reportedly landed the highest first day sales of a fiction title this year, selling 298,000 copies of A Dance with Dragons. That figure included: 170,000 hardcovers, 110,000 eBooks and 18,000 audiobooks.

Martin had this comment: “It took me longer than anyone would have liked. But now that the book is here, I hope my readers will conclude that it was worth the wait. The turnout at my signings has been extraordinary, and I’m delighted to have the chance to meet so many of my fans, both those who have been with me all the way and those who have come to the books through the terrific new HBO television series.”

Meanwhile, Paul Constant looks to the future:

I’m willing to bet that next year’s record-breaker for highest first day fiction sales will sell more e-books than hardcovers. E-books are eventually going to dominate this kind of mass market popular fiction.

Something to look forward to, perhaps. Or not. Or, maybe, to argue with someone over a glass of chardonnay at the book club.

-bd