Archive for March, 2009

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We, The Writer on the most precious baby

March 29, 2009

–msg

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What’s in a name, other than a title?

March 26, 2009

Can’t really figure the relevance of this article, other than maybe the “news” organization publishing it might have some vested interest in the house that’s publishing the book. It’s basically an advertisement, but publicity is publicity and in the publishing world it’s all about visibility. Regardless, it does speak well of the business savvy of author Joanna Smith Rakoff:

From The New York Observer‘s Leon Neyfakh:

Joanna Smith Rakoff had just turned in a major set of rewrites on her novel, Brooklyn, when her editor at Scribner broke the news to her over dinner that she would have to change its title. It seemed that Irish novelist Colm Tóibín, a Scribner author since 2000 who has been twice short-listed for the Booker Prize, wanted to use it for his forthcoming book, which was scheduled to come out this spring, just a month after Ms. Rakoff’s.

Would the young debut novelist mind terribly getting out of the way?

>>Read the entire piece here

–msg

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We, The Writer footage find

March 26, 2009

Look what I found — a cool excerpt from that elusive 1996 doculogue We, The Writer. The picture quality sucks but what Joe Wambaugh, David Brin, Mark Clements and the other authors have to say about the writing process definitely does not.

–msg

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Dogs, dragons and Michele Scott

March 25, 2009

Author and SCWC workshop leader Michele Scott (Wine Lovers Mysteries and Equestrian Horse Lovers Mysteries) has a new novel out, Zamora’s Ultimate Challenge (QUAKE/Echelon Press). A modern-day fantasy geared to “tween” readers, Michele discusses her departure from the mystery genre, her career as a prolific novelist and, yes, her dog in this interview at Candid Canine. Be sure to read to the end, and you might just win a free copy of the book. Michele, btw, will be conducting a couple of new workshops debuting at the Irvine conference come September. More on that later!

–msg

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Amazon Breakthrough Novel Award entry

March 25, 2009

An excerpt from writer and longtime SCWC conferee Debra Marshall’s terrific novel, White is for Goodbye, has made the quarterfinals of the Amazon Breakthrough Novel Award competition, general literature. As we all know, the best way to support a writer is to buy her book. In this instance, however, simply download an excerpt here for free and Debra’s increased “sales,” coupled with reviews improves her chances of publication.

Next time it could be you, so support the SCWC by supporting another writer!

–msg

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Stranger Than Fiction (#2)

March 10, 2009

I’m going to do something unusual for today’s installment of “Stranger Than Fiction”. That is, I’m going to ask you to look below the jump for the subject matter. It’s a little … uh … sensitive.
Read the rest of this entry ?

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ATTENTION MUSIC FANS

March 5, 2009

versus-poster_final_smaller

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Maximus Editus Challenge: the one good thing about Twitter

March 1, 2009

I don’t like Twitter. Like so many trendy social-networking technology fads, I find it masturbatory; yet another dispensable tool empowering narcissists to expend a profound amount of time inflicting random self-validation on a hapless world. Only without napkins.

Don’t get me right, I appreciate the celebration of self. If I wasn’t using both hands to type this, I’d be celebrating myself right now. But I digress.

Read the rest of this entry ?

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Seismic change rattles publishing world

March 1, 2009

Time magazine’s recent “Books Gone Wild: The Digital Age Reshapes Literature” is a must-read piece for writers of every level. Among my favorite excerpts from the article is this affirmation of what Wes, myself and many other members of the SCWC have been espousing for years (only more exquisitely expressed by reporter Andrea Sachs):

A lot of headlines and blogs to the contrary, publishing isn’t dying. But it is evolving, and so radically that we may hardly recognize it when it’s done. Literature interprets the world, but it’s also shaped by that world, and we’re living through one of the greatest economic and technological transformations since–well, since the early 18th century. The novel won’t stay the same: it has always been exquisitely sensitive to newness, hence the name. It’s about to renew itself again, into something cheaper, wilder, trashier, more democratic and more deliriously fertile than ever.

Read entire article.

–msg

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Addiction and influence

March 1, 2009

A former bartender dispenses wit and wisdom in a newspaper. No, this isn’t our man Decker, but one Brian McDonald, formerly of New York’s famous Elaine’s.

And on this occasion, McDonald offers some insight into his own literary addiction:

Sure, what drew me to these writers were their words: some terse and declarative, others colorful and descriptive. But the attraction also held something far more sinister: the subtle sound of ice clinking in a glass, the muted laughter of an inside joke told a few tables away, the seductive swirl of cigarette smoke climbing to the barroom ceiling. I couldn’t get enough.

—bd